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Gurdwara Sri Guru Tegh Bahadur Sahib Khiwa Kalan

Location - Khiwa Kalan, Mansa, Punjab, India


Associated with - Sri Guru Tegh Bahadur Ji


Sikh Artifacts - unknown


Sarovar - None


Sarai - unknown


This Gurdwara is situated at a distance of 22 km from Budhlada town on Mansa-Sunam Road in village Khiva Kalan.

Sri Guru Tegh Bahadur Ji visited this place while travelling from village Bhupal during Guru Ji's travels of the Malwa region.

A Sikh named Bhai Singha served Guru Ji with great respect and devotion. Bhai Singha supplied the Guru's camp with firewood and cooking utensils as well as with forage for the animals.

One day, Bhai Singha asked Guru Tegh Bahadur whether he could go to his neighbour's house as there was an engagement ceremony and Punjabi homemade sweets were being distributed for the occassion.

Guru Tegh Bahadur told Singha Ji that he need not to go anywhere from now on, as the villagers would send two shares of sweets to him directly. Bhai Singha Ji remained in the service of Guru Ji.

After the engagement ceremony, the Chaudhry asked about Bhai Singha and was told that Bhai Singha had not come as he was busy serving Guru Tegh Bahadur. The Chaudhry sent a man with two shares of sweets to Bhai Singha. From that day onwards, the villagers would always send two shares of sweets to the house of Bhai Singha.

A Gurdwara was established later to mark the site where Guru Tegh Bahadur had camped. The present Gurdwara Sri Guru Tegh Bahadur Sahib Patshahi Nauvin stands in a 50 metre square brick paved compound, with the sanctum on a high plinth. The building is topped by a four cornered dome.

The Gurdwara owns 80 acres of land and is managed by the Shiromani Gurdwara Parbandhak Committee through a local committee. Besides the daily worship and the celebration of major Sikh anniversaries, religious gatherings take place on the first of every Bikrami month.

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Guide To Discover Sikhism