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Gurdwara Sri Guru Har Rai Sahib Daulowal

Location - (approximate location) Daulowal, Ropar, Punjab, India


Associated with - Sri Guru Har Rai Sahib Ji


Sikh Artifacts - unknown


Sarovar - None


Sarai - unknown


Gurdwara Sri Guru Har Rai Sahib Daulowal is situated only 1.5 km's from Kiratpur Sahib.

Sri Guru Har Rai Sahib Ji used to camp at this location in the summer.

Once, Dara Shikoh, the son and heir of mughal emperor Shah Jahan, visited Guru Har Rai at Kiratpur Sahib. Dara Shikoh, the brother of Aurangzeb, had been poisoned by his brother. Guru Har Rai cured Dara Shikoh and gave him his blessings in 1658.

Dara Shikoh had been defeated by the mughal army of his younger brother Aurangzeb in the Battle of Samugarh, which was fought for Throne of Delhi. The mughal army was following Dara Shikoh. Spies informed emperor Aurangzeb that Guru Har Rai had helped Dara Shikoh, the fugitive Prince.

Aurangzeb used a cowardly excuse to summon Guru Har Rai to Delhi through Hari Chand, the envoy of Raja Jai Singh of Amber. Sri Guru Har Rai Sahib Ji received mughal emperor's summons, in 1661, while at Gurdwara Sri Guru Har Rai Sahib Daulowal.

Guru Har Rai wondered why he had been called to Delhi and commented, "I rule over no territory. I owe the emperor no tax. Nor do I want anything from him. There is no connection of Guru and Sikh between us, so what is this meeting for?" Guru Har Rai sent his eldest son, Ram Rai, his minister Diwan Dargah Mal and Bhai Gurdas (from the family of Bhai Behlo) to represent Guru Ji at Delhi with a copy of Aad Guru Granth Sahib Ji.

Unfortunately, Ram Rai altered some parts of Sri Guru Nanak Sahib Ji's Gurbani (in Aad Guru Granth Sahib Ji) to please the emperor. As a result Guru Har Rai excommunicated his son and never saw Ram Rai again. Furthermore, Guru Har Rai's youngest son, Sri Guru Harkrishan Sahib Ji, was made the 8th Sikh Guru.

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